Author Topic: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple  (Read 487 times)

Hythos

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Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« on: 08 March 2017, 12:07:38 »
When it comes to use of light-weight paints that may require multiple coats to achieve the same coverage vs others, with regards to base-coats, is it generally best to apply thinned, multiple coats (or, multiple coats of lighter-weight paint) to achieve the minimum amount of coverage?

Obviously the idea is to apply as little paint as possible to achieve the desired result...
But if a heavier paint provides JUST enough, vs another (or, that same when thinned) that would require 2+ coats, isn't the amount of buildup roughly the same (once the coverage is met)?
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greasyspoon

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Re: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« Reply #1 on: 08 March 2017, 12:58:23 »
I have found with heavier paints you can get a smooth finish if you keep brushing to thin it down on the surface. 

For Example I was painting my 25th anniversary boxset, the miniatures aren't crisp so I was going for speed and good quality.  So I just globed it on and keep brushing and moving the paint to cover all the mini and thin it down on the surface.  if there are little spots that where missed a wash will cover them well. I liked the results.  i do this for most all my base coats unless its a special one I want to put the extra time into.  Or if it is a base color for a Camo paint job.
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So for me it covers in one coat and looks good great keep going, especially if its rank and file troops (Flames of war, 40k, or OK mech's you don't use much). But for Hero's or really cool mech's I will go lighter and put in the extra time. 

Basically if you are happy with the results do it how over you like.

abou

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Re: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« Reply #2 on: 09 March 2017, 09:34:17 »
My advice is for multiple, thin coats, This may require two or three for some colors, but for reds as many as five. I recognize this is frustrating -- because it is. But it helps with the solidity of color and without muddying details. Reaper has a paint with a lot of pigment in it that helps with base coating, which is worth looking at.

If you invest in an airbrush, it makes life so, so, so much easier. You can get to painting the details in a fraction of the time. Although, the cost of the airbrush and compressor is a serious factor to consider.

Cache

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Re: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« Reply #3 on: 09 March 2017, 14:44:06 »
Yeah, there's a significant difference between thick paint and thin paint with heavy pigment. If you like the detail on your minis, choose thin.

Joel47

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Re: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« Reply #4 on: 17 March 2017, 12:54:41 »
If you invest in an airbrush, it makes life so, so, so much easier. You can get to painting the details in a fraction of the time. Although, the cost of the airbrush and compressor is a serious factor to consider.

Agreed. You don't know "thin base coat" until you've used an airbrush. The downsides are cost, as mentioned, and also surface prep -- I had to learn to be better with my files, because I could see surface roughness I'd caused while cleaning mold lines. (Which in turn emphasizes how thin that base coat is!)

Force of Nature

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Re: Base coats - single-coat vs multiple
« Reply #5 on: 21 March 2017, 14:28:49 »

If you invest in an airbrush, it makes life so, so, so much easier. You can get to painting the details in a fraction of the time. Although, the cost of the airbrush and compressor is a serious factor to consider.

Or go buy a can of spray paint of the base paint color you want at a model or hobby shop for a couple of bucks for the same effect and coverage as an airbrush, without the cost. However, YOU MUST shake (aggressively) the can of spray paint continuously for 10 minutes (odds are the paint has settled and separated on the shelf) to have a good mixture, then spray away! 

This is how I do a company of 12 mechs/vehicles at a time... I have 1000+ Battletech miniatures to paint. So anything to speed up the painting process to finish the miniature is always good with me.
« Last Edit: 21 March 2017, 14:44:18 by Force of Nature »

 

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