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Author Topic: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis  (Read 762 times)

sadlerbw

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #30 on: 09 July 2020, 15:21:51 »
Every moment you spend worrying about how much work you have to do is a moment you spend not getting it done. I don't want to sound like a Hallmark movie but just sitting down and painting is how you are going to work through those mechs and get better at it.

Don't worry, I get what you are saying. I tell my kids stuff like that all the time, and it is true. The thing is, I didn't want to admit how much this was bothering me. To begin with I told myself that since I like assembly and modding, that was all I needed to do and I should just enjoy that. I tried to convince myself that it was OK not to paint all my minis...and that is OK, in a general sense. However, having so very much un-painted was bothering me and I didn't want to admit it because I also wasn't looking forward to doing any painting.

I do appreciate the pep-talk.

worktroll

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #31 on: 09 July 2020, 21:47:19 »
I‘ve dug myself into quite the hole over here. I probably have 150-ish metal minis that re only primed or bare metal. I‘ve got another 60 or so plastics from box sets and lance packs, and I’m pretty sure I have over 100 coming from the Kickstarter. I’ve been collecting and not painting for a while now, and I think my backlog has actually grown large enough to start dealing psychic damage!

I found myself in a similar situation - 234 (I remember exactly!) 'Mechs, vees, and lots of DA stuff too. Eight years later I've painted 66 battalion-sized forces, a few jobs for friends, some solos, etc. Currently "down" to only 100-odd 'Mechs, probably half as much DA stuff (can't find all the bits I want any more), and I'm happy with my wierd obsession with making combined-arms battalion.

In short, it's not a problem, it's a process. I also find painting helps remove the aches from too much typing & mousing at work (main reason I brush prime).

You don't have to do it all at once - the SLDF wasn't painted in a day! Set some achievable goals. Give them a go. Pick a new target. It's almost Zen (and is Kaizen ;) )
* No, FASA wasn't big on errata - ColBosch
* The Housebook series is from the 80's and is the foundation of Btech, the 80's heart wrapped in heavy metal that beats to this day - Sigma
* To sum it up: FASAnomics: By Cthulhu, for Cthulhu - Moonsword
* Because Battletech is a conspiracy by Habsburg & Bourbon pretenders - MadCapellan
* The Hellbringer is cool, either way. It's not cool because it's bad, it's cool because it's bad with balls - Nightsky
* It was a glorious time for people who felt that we didn't have enough Marauder variants - HABeas2, re "Empires Aflame"

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #32 on: 10 July 2020, 02:20:25 »
I did an awful job of painting for years, and I think I played less than I otherwise would have like because of it.

Now, when I'm trying to bang out a bunch of mechs, I approach it like this (but I don't know that I would listen to me if I were you):

(0. If metal, superglue the metal mini to a hex, and vinyl spackle on the base around the feet. After it dries, you can use an exacto knife to scratch off stray spackle.)

1. Prime in white if you want light colors like white or yellow or sky blue, and grey if you want something darker like olive drab or navy.  Just grab a $4 can of primer at the hardware store.  If you want to basecoat other colors, you can save some time by priming in the matte version of the spray primer, but not any with texture (like "ULTRAMATTE", which has a popcorn type gritty texture... I mean, unless you're into that).  I use loctite fun-tak for metal ones or double sided tape for plastic to stick them to a piece of 5x8 chunk of cardboard cut from a shipping box for priming and basecoating, and only take them off and stick them to a spray paint can lid when I get to the detailing and basing. I knocked over a lance once and they fell 4 feet to the floor and got all janked up, and since then, I keep them stuck to the cardboard until they are done.  Spray in quick bursts from 6-10 inches away. If you prime in grey or black, do a light spray of white from above to bring the details back out so you can see what you're doing later on. I used to think spray primer was not "right" or something, but it works great and saves a ton of time.

2. To base coat, dilute acrylic paints with water until they are a bit runny, a bit like a wash, but you don't see individual pigment specks floating around. You'll do two or three base coats, so it's nice to do one or two lances all at once. I use army painter for tan/green/yellow/brown, some more gimicky colors from games workshop for clan mechs, and basic junk acrylic paints for generic inner sphere.  I hate the globby acrylic look though, I would much rather do another coat than have that caked-on thing going.

3. Once basecoated, I use runefang steel on some weapons and actuators, then touch a dot of red or green or blue on lasers or ppc's. For missile racks, you can paint black over it, then gently brush the runefang steel over the top; like very little metallic paint and gentle, light brushes. Now's the time to add some other bits of color or camo, but that's just extra work if you just want mechs to toss on the tabletop. Just keep it simple. I often drybrush a bit of grey or black or a darker shade of the base color to bring out details, but if you're going to do a wash, you can skip that; a bit of drybrush can break up lines and give a worn look, though.  Just a bit of runefang steel on the legs and arms can make a huge difference.

4. For cockpits, I just paint them yellow or blue over black, sometimes red; it depends on the color of the mech. I don't really like the jeweling everyone does, personally, but that's obviously taste. I always put a dark wash on cockpits to break up the flat look and add some "noise" to it. It also pools around the edges and gives it more of a "canopy" look.

5. If you want to wash, water down the Vallejo wash a bit or use Nuln oil. You don't need to overdo it, which really makes the mech look gritty. You can just touch the tip of the brush to an area with detailing and the wash will seep into it through capillary action, without necessarily slobbering the stuff all over the mech. I always wash the cockpit and silver bits, but sometimes (because the acrylic basecoat was watery and a lot of pigment got in the cracks, making those spots darker like a contrast paint without a wash) it's not necessary to get a detailed look. The mechs look "newer" without the wash. If the wash is too dark, you can drybrush the color back up, but it sounds like you don't want to waste the time on that. If you use contrast paints, or multiple coats of a watery acrylic for basecoating, the wash isn't always necessary and can sometimes ruin the look you're going for.

6. Basing can feel like a huge waste of time. You can use Agrellan Earth or Astrogranite from GW and call it a day. If you want, use Elmer's Glue to put some sand and green flock on the base instead of the GW stuff. If you want, you can paint or drybrush over Agrellan Earth and Astrogranite, but it looks fine without any extra work. I've used transparent crackle over white to get a snowy/icey effect and it was fun, but this feels like a time killer in general to me. Those Army Painter tufts look kind of cool but I have never used one. You can always just paint it black and say that "it's a battlemech, not a child's diorama", and strike fear into the heart of your opponent.

7. Spray with Krylon matte acrylic to keep the paint from getting easily damaged. The added benefit is that it takes the shine off the mini, so that the color looks better, and the everything just looks much crisper.

That is entirely what I do. I thought about doing paneling and everything, but I don't have the patience. Like, the awesome? Nah, man.

If I'm doing a generic batch of mechs, I usually do a group of six: one light, one assault, two medium, two heavy. Then you can kind of put together a Light/Med/Med/Heavy lance on the light side, or a Med/Heavy/Heavy/Assault lance on the other end of the scale, or whatever. When you're doing six, the first is dry by the time you finish the sixth, so you can just run through the steps with minimal wait time. If I prime in the morning, spackle at lunch, basecoat after work, and finish the rest after dinner, I can seal them the next morning and get stuff done quickly.

Then it's pretty efficient to just bang out a green lance (could be Davion or Capellan) or red (could be Kurita or mercs) or white (could be Comstar or whatever) or grey (GDL or anything). It feels more efficient not to go after specific units, since you can just lump mechs together that don't have that extra level of detailing to make them exactly Lyran Guard, for example. Just do the arms and legs blue and the torso white, and it's in the ballpark of Lyran Guard but could be anything.

I have grown fond of "stippling": you get a small amount of paint on the brush, almost like you're going to drybrush, but then you just rapidly stab the mech with the brush in a small area. The word it makes my mind think is "flecks". It gives a noisy look, and I like the results better for things like camo when I attempt it: just get a small brush, and rotate the mech slowly, dotting out some paths and breaking up the straight lines a bit. If you are conservative about how much paint you use, you can add more flecks by stippling more, and it's a more forgiving way to experiment. If the camo scheme goes wrong, just basecoat over it, or fleck the whole mech to give it a noisy look.

Re: hands cramping up. When I'm detailing or basing, I take the mech and stick it to the cap of a spray can, so I can hold that instead of the base. You can rotate the can upside down to get a better angle. Helps a lot if you're not doing that.

Re: drybrushing. I dab acrylic paint on a crap brush, then wipe it on a cardboard box until I don't see any more paint coming off. Then I use quick strokes over to bring out the detail or make edges look worn.

The wet pallette suggestion is a really good one too. I just put a wet paper towel under parchment paper in a plastic tupperware container.

My mechs do not look awesome but I get them done quickly and have fun with them.
« Last Edit: 10 July 2020, 02:54:02 by Renard »

Mohammed As`Zaman Bey

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #33 on: 10 July 2020, 03:46:56 »
  One of my best friends, long passed away, was a wargamer, introduced me to miniature wargaming in the mid-1970s and literally could field a WW2 or Modern Soviet Corps in 1/285th scale metal tanks hated to paint minis. He'd trim them, place them in a box in his garage and spray primer them then paint them all one color with a spray can as well. I used to earn $1 per mini to paint German micros and made good money at it, enough to buy sheets of decals and charge for them as well. I was well known among the collectors as I used to sign and date every mini I painted. This was before acrylics became popular, so everything was painted with enamels, which were far more durable, especially the enamels used for scale railroad trains.
  Eventually I learned to bake on enamel finishes that were nigh impossible to scratch or chip -the mini would warp and crack long before the paint would show it. One of these days I'll go back to all enamels for my metal figs.

sadlerbw

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #34 on: 10 July 2020, 12:25:03 »
Thanks again to everyone for the suggestions. I've convinced myself to try a few things and see how I like them. Not sure I'm going to try right away, but I bought some supplies to try some different methods and see if I can find something that is 'good enough' to get through most of my minis.

A couple random comments:
- the hand that cramps up on me is my brush hand, not the one holding the mini. I've got some methods for sticking minis to a larger object to hold if needed, so I'm doing OK there.
- 'Slobbering stuff all over the mech' is my go-to technique!
- I always think of Marik as 'the purple guys', but other than the Marik Militia, not many of their units are primarily purple. I think maybe the Covanent Guard is the only other marik unit that uses purple as a base color.
- I'm always pleasantly surprised how nice and helpful folks are on this forum. Thanks again!

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #35 on: 10 July 2020, 12:46:50 »
   Eventually I learned to bake on enamel finishes that were nigh impossible to scratch or chip -the mini would warp and crack long before the paint would show it. One of these days I'll go back to all enamels for my metal figs.

When I was a kid in the 80s I used Testors with no priming and no wash or finish (...or hex bases), but I can't really compare that to my adult experience with acrylic. Besides durability, how does enamel compare to acrylic? I've used acrylic since I got back into battletech a few years ago, but I still have a few of those little glass Testors pots. I thought about using them but haven't been able to get myself psyched up to do it.

I have a beat up timberwolf that has suffered many indignities in the name of painting experimentation. It might be time for him to make another noble sacrifice for the good of the clan.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #36 on: 10 July 2020, 13:09:48 »
Here's a white primed axeman, and a basecoated green bushwacker with two or three coats of green Army Painter acrylic pretty watered down. Since it's pretty runny, it gets in all the cracks and does some of the work of highlighting that the wash would do, but I probably won't wash, as that will kill the light color, just some black or brown drybrush to add noise.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #37 on: 10 July 2020, 13:11:28 »
The thunderbolt isn't even painted, just primed black, then a spray of white over the top, and a red cockpit. I just liked the look and stopped.

The rifleman was super easy. Just green basecoat, some gray, black base. Boom, done. Same with the marauder.


Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #38 on: 10 July 2020, 13:13:50 »
Warhammer with the Astrogranite base. The searchlight is how I usually do cockpits, just blue over black, then a wash to make the edges look more defined. The runefang steel helps the mech have more going on, at the knees, the elbow joints, the big bolts, the chunky bits on the shins.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #39 on: 10 July 2020, 13:18:24 »
Blackjack with a grey basecoat and light gray and blue drybrushing, with Agrellan Earth.  Gotta warn you about Agrellan Earth: it rips the primer and paint below it right off if you use vinyl spackle. I don't get this with plastic bases, or if I prime the base a lot first, or if I use green stuff. Normally the base effect doesn't look as intense.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #40 on: 10 July 2020, 13:20:12 »
Here's a wolfhound with the crackle base and a yellow cockpit.  Just gray primer with white and blue and grey drybrushing to give it a winter look.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #41 on: 10 July 2020, 13:23:02 »
To me, the runefang silver looks really good with a bit of black wash over it, especially for missile racks, actuators, and weapon barrels.

It took me forever with this guy because I kept messing up, then having to touch up with red; especially the blue cockpit, the black face and stripe on the chest. A black wash hides a lot of those kinds of mistakes.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #42 on: 10 July 2020, 13:30:04 »
Just grey primer, then brown/grey drybrushing, with runefang silver highlights with a wash on them, and the cockpit in red and Agrellan earth base. I ended up liking it, but I had a different plan for this guy, and might strip it and try the original plan again.  I didn't mean for the brown to take over the whole mech and make it look bronze, I wanted a grey, industrial-looking war machine with dirt on it. It looks kind of cool though, to me.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #43 on: 10 July 2020, 13:43:22 »
Easy cockpits: orange or yellow or blue-over-black, then black wash. After you do the acrylic matte spray, they look, you know, fine. If you blow air on them a bit, especially a big cockpit like a battlemaster or a victor, it pushes the wash away from the center, making it look like a dirty windshield that is typically headed into the wind.

White drybrushing over the blue brings the details out.

sadlerbw

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #44 on: 10 July 2020, 15:54:00 »
That black and white primed thunderbolt is how the majority of my minis look. I guess I could try to bribe some of the CSO guys to canonize that as the official paint scheme for some mercenary command that exists in all eras. That would be one way of solving my problem!

Joking aside, thanks for posting up those pics Renard. Looks like you found some pretty effective ways to get minis on the table while giving them an identity. One of the best things about having minis with any paint on them at all: In a larger battle (I tend to play Alpha Strike), it can get difficult to remember whose mechs are whose when they are all just primer or silver. Even if the colors don't all match, it is so much easier to keep track of the 'Red Trebuchet' than 'The Treb that is closest to that rock and facing your home edge'!

Sartris

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #45 on: 10 July 2020, 16:02:15 »
i also do not like painting very much. i have little to no confidence in my painting skills, but i do have extreme confidence in my ability to cut corners. i've largely gone to a three-four color setup. is it the prettiest thing in the world? no. do i feel embarrassed putting them on the table? also no. do i care if they get knicked up from actually playing with them? definitely not.



1. Army Painter Bone White Color Primer
2. Purple highlights
3. gunmetal grey for the guns
4. black micro pen to color in the cockpit
5. let dry maybe 10-15 minutes
6. dunk it in minwax wood finish to get the wash-like effect in the recesses (this company used either jacobin or red mahogany, i can't remember for certain)
7. pad down with a paper towel to remove excess, especially the blobs that form on panels
8. let dry about 48 hours
9. give it a shot of anti-shine matte
10. another coat of protective spray satin varnish (i use the army painter Aegis Suit but i'm sure there are cheaper options, same with the color primer) 

minus the minwax coat, i do a whole company like this in about two-four hours, depending on the detail. you can see where i goofed with the purple in places but eh, you gotta get real close to notice.

sadlerbw

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #46 on: 10 July 2020, 16:07:12 »
4. black micro pen to color in the cockpit

What is this wizardry you speak of? Are you, like, using a sharpie to do the cockpits? Does that work???

Sartris

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #47 on: 10 July 2020, 16:11:14 »
i erred slightly - they're called micron pens - basically ink pens for art with small tips (.4/.5mm) they act a bit like a sharpie, yeah. also useful for filling in lines between panels after you drybrush

cockpits are often so small that it's hard for me to get the paint in there without blotching the whole area. the pen largely solved this problem for me. i generally use black or blue. besides the army painter sprays, i pretty much buy all my stuff at Michael's or Blick art materials

Sartris

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #48 on: 10 July 2020, 16:18:46 »
i will also note that coming to accept that some jobs are going to look bad is part of the learning process. many of these schemes i do are acceptable. none are really high quality but that's not what i'm shooting for.

some of them have turned out downright ugly. if i ever pull my celestial level ii out of the storage case i'll post it some time. it's horrific - but also an experiment in seeing what colors work together (in that particular case the experiment failed). just using two and three complimentary color sets is the easiest way to go, along with some basic camo.

carlisimo

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #49 on: 10 July 2020, 16:29:47 »
What is this wizardry you speak of? Are you, like, using a sharpie to do the cockpits? Does that work???

A lot of these pens are made for gundam modelers.  It's not just black, I've seen people apply gold trim with a pen.  In either case, you clean it up with a Q-tip with rubbing alcohol and then you apply a clear coat because it'll rub off.

I didn't find it any faster, but you might.

Mohammed As`Zaman Bey

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #50 on: 10 July 2020, 18:44:14 »
Besides durability, how does enamel compare to acrylic?
  Back in the day when I collected lead 54mm figs, enamels was all there was and there were a dozen manufacturers (Humbrol, Imery-Risley, Testors, Tamiya, Pactra, to name a few) who turned out paints of all levels of quality (Humbrol was top of the line and VERY expensive). For airbrush artists, like me, acrylics of the day couldn't touch enamels, as I could thin enamels, mix and paint without any problems. At that time, acrylics on the market (they were sold in tubes and used as a cheap version of oil paints) would coagulate and clump, which made using acrylics a big hassle to use.
  In the 1970s I sold custom painted T-shirts and tank tops (with tanks painted on them) so acrylics was a good medium for fabric work, and far cheaper than fabric paints, but not for detailed work on minis, due to streaking. It literally took years for decent acrylic paints to come out (I'm talking the 1990s) due to games like WH40K (I call it "That foreign game" with disgust) becoming popular and the fact that water-based paints are easier to ship than (flammable) oil-based medium. Now, oils are harder to find in the range now available in acrylics.

  Today's acrylics are formulated to be more stable far easier to use and you can get similar results as you can with enamels, as far as appearance is concerned, but unless you finish your minis with a thick, clear coat of enamel, they won't ever be close to durable for constant handling. I checked some model railroad sites and many are distressed that Testors is discontinuing their Floquil line of model paints.

  Sorry for the long dissertation but I figure a little background would be helpful.

Renard

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #51 on: 10 July 2020, 23:33:27 »
  Back in the day when I collected lead 54mm figs, enamels was all there was and there were a dozen manufacturers (Humbrol, Imery-Risley, Testors, Tamiya, Pactra, to name a few) who turned out paints of all levels of quality (Humbrol was top of the line and VERY expensive). For airbrush artists, like me, acrylics of the day couldn't touch enamels, as I could thin enamels, mix and paint without any problems. At that time, acrylics on the market (they were sold in tubes and used as a cheap version of oil paints) would coagulate and clump, which made using acrylics a big hassle to use.
  In the 1970s I sold custom painted T-shirts and tank tops (with tanks painted on them) so acrylics was a good medium for fabric work, and far cheaper than fabric paints, but not for detailed work on minis, due to streaking. It literally took years for decent acrylic paints to come out (I'm talking the 1990s) due to games like WH40K (I call it "That foreign game" with disgust) becoming popular and the fact that water-based paints are easier to ship than (flammable) oil-based medium. Now, oils are harder to find in the range now available in acrylics.

  Today's acrylics are formulated to be more stable far easier to use and you can get similar results as you can with enamels, as far as appearance is concerned, but unless you finish your minis with a thick, clear coat of enamel, they won't ever be close to durable for constant handling. I checked some model railroad sites and many are distressed that Testors is discontinuing their Floquil line of model paints.

  Sorry for the long dissertation but I figure a little background would be helpful.

I am super interested, I enjoyed your perspective. I was surprised when I got back into battletech and people were using acrylic. I remembered the horrendous gloop, and thought maybe it was just because I didn't know what I was doing. I am realizing I am pretty careful with my minis, but I was going to try to get a biweekly game going at the local hobby store... Given what you said, probably want to bring the AGOAC plastic minis rather than the 1986 Marauder.  I have to admit, I kind of prefer the plastic minis. I have the citytech and boxed set ones from late 80s/early 90s, and I worry about them a million times less than the lead/pewter ral partha ones.

WH40K is so strange! It's a British game about rooting for space Nazis unironically! Like I look at the art, and I just see, "SPACE NAZIS AND EVIL CATHOLICS." When I was a kid it was just taking control. I was at the hobby place stuck between the Magic card kids and the WH40K/Necromunda kids. It was bizarre. To think that big parts of the history of the tabletop hobby are driven by that game is surprising to me, but your account sounds totally right. My Jade Falcon star is all GW paints, because they are comically bright, the way I imagine clan mechs would be. Sometimes I think about picking up the entry level space marine squad and throwing it in my bag just to have something to play if that's what's on offer, but then I realize, that would be a step down a dark path from which there might be no coming back.

Are you very interested in the battletech lore? I got into battletech, and I understood 3025 and could tell you about each mech like other kids could tell you about baseball stats or something (I am not sure I even 100% understood the rules but could tell you the loadout of any mech), and 3050 hit, and it was wild (mechwarrior 2 haunts my dreams). I feel like that 3025-3050 era keeps getting lived out again and again, even if the lore moves on nominally, with the Jihad and the Republic etc.; even the kickstarter is just 3050 redux. The battletech games are usually just before the clan invasion or just after. My big question is, was there ever really an contemporaneous era before 3025 the way fans lived out the clan invasion in books, games, and the tabletop? Like if I had gotten into it sooner, would 3025/war of 3039 have also been similarly ground shaking? When I was a kid I was pro-Wolf and Davion or Steiner, and now I am basically pro-Jade Falcon and even almost Word of Blake. I wonder how much of all of that is just timing, or if the 3025-3050 transition was iconic beyond my own perception of the game.  Like, was there a time where people talked about the Succession Wars the same way the Clan Invasion?

Greatclub

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #52 on: 10 July 2020, 23:40:59 »
Mohammed As`Zaman Bey - what's your recipe for baking enamels? I've heard a couple, bun never tried one.

Mohammed As`Zaman Bey

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #53 on: 11 July 2020, 06:27:14 »
Mohammed As`Zaman Bey - what's your recipe for baking enamels? I've heard a couple, bun never tried one.
  Enamels are petroleum based, so much of their curing is controlled by the rate the solvent evaporates. High humidity can screw up the curing process and even turn the paint tacky, that is, it doesn't cure at all.
  The baking process removes the humidity and speeds the evaporation. In addition, it causes the paint to bond further, into a more dense "shell" than it would under normal room temp drying. That all being said, do not try baking your plastics. I shouldn't have to tell you but I will anyway. Do not bake your plastics. If the metal fig has any acrylic paints, they will burn... Baking is only for petroleum-based enamel paints. I will also include the other warnings: Avoid inhaling fumes, keep your work area well-ventilated, keep away from children and pets, make sure all W-2 forms are properly filled out.

  Most enamel bake jobs are good at 165 degrees in a toaster oven, although I have seen recommended temps in the 200 degree range on the model train sites. Model trains are steel or brass, so they can take higher temps. Lead melts at 650, and some of the low-melt Antimony allows melt at under 500, so a max of 200 fahrenheit is pretty safe.

Cergorach

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #54 on: 11 July 2020, 07:22:03 »
My main question is, would you change your mind on whether you enjoy painting minis if you could get better/faster results? Or would it just be a tedious job that would get done faster withe better results?

If your outlook to painting is never going to change. Why bother with getting more efficient and/or better results? Get someone else do the painting for you. This will most likely cost you money, but how much generally depends on the professional level of the painter (this has nothing to do with quality of painting). Often kids have a ton of time and very little money, also very limited options to make money for their hobby. You could of course make your own (kids that is ;-), but it takes a while for them to get to the level of painting... As an alternative, nieces and nephews are a great source of painted minis. Normally you could also visit the local gamestores (gamesworkshop is a good source) instead of giving them money directly, offer them a trade: Paint x minis for me, I'll buy you anything in the store worth Y. That also makes the gamestore owner happy and your not paying for childlabor... I'm pretty sure they'll prefer that over flipping burgers or running a paperroute!

Online there are many professional painting services, results are very varied. I would avoid painting shops (with multiple employees) and go with individuals instead.

An airbrush takes a lot of money if you want a good one and also a lot of time if you want to use it well. The same is true with painting, especially batch painting. There are a TON of good video's on YouTube that handle batchpainting that is relevant also for Mechs, but if your never going to enjoy it, why bother? Find something you do like doing and possibly trade that for painting services...

Greatclub

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #55 on: 11 July 2020, 13:30:22 »
I shouldn't have to tell you but I will anyway. Do not bake your plastics.

Don't have to tell me, but does have to be said.




A trick I got out of a book on cosplay props is pre-heating rattle cans to get a better coat; the droplets merge better and dry different. Warning - don't overheat. Hot tap-water is about as high as you should go.

I haven't had any frosting since I started.

Quote from: PAINTING & WEATHERING FOR PROPS & REPLICAS BY HARRISON KRIX
Technobabble: Spray cans in the US are regulated by the Department of Transportation and have ratings for burst temperature at specified psi.
The can types most prop hobbyists interact with are DOT 2Q and DOT 2P. Respectively these operate at 140-160psig
@130ºF and 162-180psig @130ºF. In order to be US DOT rated, burst cannot occur below 1.5 times maximum pressure at 130ºF
(240psig/270psig). Chances are your hot water tap won’t be pushing the can over 130ºF – average hot water heaters in the US run
at about 110ºF – but this gives you some math to keep an eye on when using this trick


Pat Payne

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #56 on: 11 July 2020, 13:58:33 »
2. Quality: I suck. No two ways about it, I am not a good painter.
Remember: You don't have to be good enough for CamoSpecs, you just have to be good enough for yourself:thumbsup: If you don't like painting you don't like painting and that's OK (we're not 40K, nobody's gonna ban you from a table for bare metal or plastic), just don't fall into the trap that if your work isn't even close to up to the level of Weirdo or some of the other master painters on the boards that it automatically sucks then and there.

If you made it this far, thanks for listening! I think I just needed to get this off my chest! Maybe I'll snap some pics of the minis I was working on later this week. I'm not proud of the paint jobs, but I am proud of the mods on some of them. I especially think the Arrow IV Legionnaire mod turned out well.

Can't speak for anyone else, but I'd love to see 'em!

worktroll

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #57 on: 11 July 2020, 16:06:19 »
A trick I got out of a book on cosplay props is pre-heating rattle cans to get a better coat; the droplets merge better and dry different. Warning - don't overheat. Hot tap-water is about as high as you should go.

I haven't had any frosting since I started.

Simpler trick - stick the can under your armpit, and let body heat do the job for 10-15 minutes. I'll do that when the weather is fine but cold, and likewise no frosting.
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Cazaril

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Re: I have come to accept that I don't really enjoy painting minis
« Reply #58 on: 12 July 2020, 12:38:29 »
However, despite my best efforts I just don't enjoy doing that painting myself.

Amen...

I'm in the same boat. Love to bash/repose, hate to paint. Hate even more the idea of leaving them bare metal.

I can't give you tips on how to paint faster, mainly because the first color on any one of my minis takes 10-12 hours, and it isn't unheard of for a freshly primed mini to take 2 weeks. And that is just 1 mini...

The only thing I can maybe help with, is a way to make yourself paint.

I try to bash/repose one, then paint it before I move on to the next. While I'm painting, I either think about the next one I want to build or come up with a history for the one I'm painting, and it helps distract me from the task at hand. This doesn't always work because sometimes I've got a great idea and really want to work on getting it built, but it keeps me from being overwhelmed by a mountain of primed minis that I know I will only have to move on to after I finish the one I'm working on. I try to limit my backlog to no more than 3.

My main question is, would you change your mind on whether you enjoy painting minis if you could get better/faster results? Or would it just be a tedious job that would get done faster withe better results?

If your outlook to painting is never going to change. Why bother with getting more efficient and/or better results? Get someone else do the painting for you.

His question is a very good one... What would make painting better for you? Are you looking for higher quality in the same time? More minis in the same time? Or do you honestly not think there is anything that will help?

Sometimes it is more tolerable than others (if you'll notice my work seems to come in spurts), but I don't think I'll ever truly enjoy painting again. I can only find ways to keep on doing it.

So why do it at all? Well, there are a couple of reasons... The biggest is that I can't stand the idea of a shelf full of bare metal/primed minis. I could farm the job out to someone, but I like how mine come out (which is another reason and an advantage I have over sadlerbw). Plus, if I have someone else paint them, they aren't really MY work anymore. If you've ever watched "Chasing Amy", all the repose/bash work is like being a "tracer", the real artist is the painter. And unless I really like the painter, why would I bother to display them. There is a certain pride to a paint job you did yourself, even if it is just tabletop quality, that isn't there with other people's work.

Caz